Saturday, Jul 02
Speedway Digest Staff

Speedway Digest Staff

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Another six-race-week is on the docket for the third week of competition in the 37th DIRTcar Summer Nationals Hell Tour.

 

Loaded with annual staple venues and the return of some old favorites, the Late Models and DIRTcar Summit Racing Equipment Modified Nationals competitors will be tested with a variety of track sizes and rigorous travel schedule over the next six days.

 

Multi-State Week schedule

Tuesday, June 28 – Red Hill Raceway (Sumner, IL)
Wednesday, June 29 – Benton Speedway (Benton, MO)
Thursday, June 30 – Fayette County Speedway (Brownstown, IL)
Friday, July 1 – Paducah International Raceway (Paducah, KY)
Saturday, July 2 – Clarksville Speedway (Clarksville, TN)
Sunday, July 3 – Lincoln Speedway (Lincoln, IL)

 

Tickets for each event will be available at the gates on race day. If you can’t make it to your favorite track, watch all the action live on DIRTVision – online at DIRTVision.com or with the DIRTVision mobile app.

 

Here are the drivers to watch for and the storylines to follow this week:

 

POINTS TAKE SHAPE – After eleven-straight races through the first two weeks, four-time and reigning Summer Nationals Late Model champion Bobby Pierce maintains a 90-point lead in the standings over Jason Feger. Pierce, of Oakwood, IL, skipped the World of Outlaws CASE Construction Equipment Late Model Series’ appearance Sunday night at Jacksonville Speedway to prepare for the upcoming Multi-Sate Week, indicating a potential run for his fifth tour championship.

 

Jason Feger, of Bloomington, IL, has taken over second in points after posting one of his best finishes of the season Saturday against the Outlaws at Federated Auto Parts Raceway at I-55, chasing winner Dennis Erb Jr. for most of the 55-lap finale before Pierce passed him late. Ryan Unzicker, of El Paso, IL, has dropped to third in points, most recently passing 14 cars in his drive from 23rd to ninth against the World of Outlaws Saturday night in Pevely. Both drivers are projected to be on the roster during Multi-State Week.

 

Fellow four-time Summer Nationals champion Brian Shirley boosted himself to fourth in points after notching back-to-back victories, starting with the Illinois-Iowa Week closer at Sycamore Speedway on June 19 and winning again two nights later at Missouri’s Springfield Raceway. Shirley, of Chatham, IL, and the Bob Cullen Racing team are expected to be in attendance throughout Multi-State Week.

 

COOLING OFF – For the first time since September 2020, Nick Hoffman has finished second or worse in two consecutive Summit Modified Features.

 

The four-time and defending champion from Mooresville, NC, was bested by winner Rick Conoyer and runner-up Will Krup in Friday’s portion of the St. Louis Firecracker Faceoff at I-55 and broke a camshaft in the engine while coming to the checkered on Saturday, leaving him with a DNF in 16th-place.

 

However, he still holds a giant lead in the standings, 131 points ahead of second-place Kyle Steffens. With seven wins in nine starts, he’s now only five wins away from maxing-out his win total for the fourth-straight year, as only a driver’s best 12 finishes are taken into account in championship points.

 

GUESS WHO’S BACK – He’s been out of action for the past three seasons, but this week, National Dirt Late Model Hall-of-Famer Terry English returns to the seat of a DIRTcar Late Model this Friday and Saturday night.

 

Terry, the 2002 DIRTcar Late Model national champion and father to 2021 Hell Tour regular Tanner English, will pilot a 2016 Rocket XR1 Chassis in the Summer Nationals shows at the newly reopened Paducah International Raceway (July 1) and Clarksville Speedway (July 2). The car has sat in their Benton, KY, shop since Tanner competed with it in the 2019 Gateway Dirt Nationals but has since been revitalized and adorned with Terry’s famed No. 96 decal on the door panels.

 

Terry has five Summer Nationals victories to his credit – his most recent coming at Illinois’ Highland Speedway on June 17, 2008.

 

OLD FRIEND – This week, the Summer Nationals will see a familiar face return to the Late Model roster.

 

2021 DIRTcar Late Model Rookie of the Year Ashton Winger, of Hampton, GA, is expected to start his week with the Summer Nationals Tuesday at Red Hill Raceway and follow it up with a visit to Benton Speedway in Missouri on Wednesday.

 

Winger completed the entire 2021 Hell Tour schedule with his own equipment but will bring the G.R. Smith-owned Gambler Transport Motorsports Rocket XR1 #89 to the track this week – a car he’s been at the controls of since the racing season began in January.

 

WHAT’S OLD IS NEW – Three of the six tracks on the docket this week have not hosted a Summer Nationals race in at least nine years.

 

Red Hill Raceway’s grand re-opening takes place this Tuesday, June 28, with the Summer Nationals and Summit Modified stars in attendance at the revived facility in Sumner, IL. No race car of any type has graced the dirt of the 3/8-mile oval since the last time it hosted competition in 2004 (officially closed in 2005), but Midwest racing promoter Jeremy Sneed has since purchased the property and put life back in it, now ready for its first Summer Nationals show since 2000.

 

Benton Speedway in Benton, MO, sat dormant from 2014 until last fall, when owner Rob Russell reopened the property for racing once again. The Late Models are scheduled to make their first appearance at 3/8-mile oval for the first time since 1997 on Wednesday, June 29, while the Modifieds will make their debut.

 

Paducah International Raceway in Paducah, KY, hosted a Summer Nationals event every year from 1996-2013. The half-mile oval was later closed in 2016 and again in 2018 but has since reopened under new owners Adam and Brittany Elliot, who have breathed new life and a weekly racing program back into the track. The track is set to host its 19th Summer Nationals event and fourth Summit Modified event this Friday, July 1.

 

DIRTcar Series PR

Each summer, the quarter-mile of Charlotte Motor Speedway is flooded with the very best Legend Cars and Bandolero for the Cook Out Summer Shootout, where drivers from all over the country and around the world test their mettle against the toughest grassroots racing competition. One of those drivers, 18-year-old Boston Reid & Co. Legends Pro division’s Justice Calabro, is a shootout regular, but the California native’s path to America’s Home for Racing has been anything but normal.

His route to the track began with the movie, Herbie Fully Loaded. Calabro quickly fell in love with the idea of driving and being behind the wheel of a car.

He first got a taste of racing at an indoor go-kart track. At the age of 14, Calabro got behind the wheel of his first Legend Car when he participated in a driving school near the speedway. Like something out of the movies, his raw, unpolished skill impressed the Stillwell Racing team, earning him a spot to race against some of the sport’s best drivers. But in order to chase racing glory, he first had to make the move to North Carolina.

Calabro and his family made the decision to pursue his dream of racing and moved from California to Charlotte.

“My mom, dad, grandma, grandpa and myself all packed up and moved away from California,” Calabro said. “My parents left their jobs and their whole lives behind so that I could come out here and pursue racing.”

Calabro got his first victory in the Legend’s Young Lions division of the 2019 Winter Heat at Charlotte Motor Speedway.

So far this Cook Out Summer Shootout season, the No. 25 Legends car for the Boston Reid & Company Pro division has seen success in each round, improving his finishing position each round, including a sixth-place finish last week.

“I would say it has been a fruitful journey so far,” said Calabro.

This is Calabro’s fourth summer racing the Cook Out Summer Shootout. The excitement continues this Tuesday, with “Awful Night.” It will be a night of great racing, a “celebrity” autograph session, silly shenanigans, a forgettable t-shirt toss making it an all-around “awful” night.

TICKETS:

Cook Out Summer Shootout continues Tuesday, June 28. Entry is $10 for adults; $5 entry for anyone named Karen; kids 12 and under are FREE. Tickets can be purchased at the gate or online at www.charlottemotorspeedway.com/tickets.

KEEP TRACK:

Follow all the thrilling CookOut Summer Shootout action using the hashtag #WeCreateLegends. Connect with Charlotte Motor Speedway on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

CMS PR

Ally 400

 

AJ Allmendinger, No. 16 Gold Fish Casino Slots Camaro ZL1

Start: 14th

Stage 1 Finish: 15th

Stage 2 Finish: 12th

Finish: 19th

“Nashville was a challenge. Our No. 16 Gold Fish Casino Slots Camaro showed some good speed, and we drove up to the top 10. Unfortunately, we struggled with some of the same issues we had all weekend. We had a list of things to try on pit road to make it better, but we couldn’t quite get a grasp on it. We will take everything we learned and build on our notebook for next time. Road America should hopefully be a good place for our team to keep moving in a positive direction.”

 

- AJ Allmendinger

 

Justin Haley, No. 31 LeafFilter Gutter Protection Camaro ZL1

Start: 21st

Stage 1 Finish: 26th

Stage 2 Finish: 15th

Finish: 23rd

 

"We fought a tight car all day. We made some gains on pit road, but it was not the best day for us collectively. We have some work to do as a team, but we will move on to Road America."

 

- Justin Haley

Tennessee Lottery 250

 

AJ Allmendinger, No. 16 Nutrien Ag Solutions Chevrolet

Start: 2nd

Stage 1 finish: 4th

Stage 2 finish: 11th

Finish: 16th

“We had a promising day with a fast No. 16 Nutrien Ag Solutions Chevy. We overcame a speeding penalty, made gains on pit road and were on track for a solid finish. Unfortunately our tire strategy just didn’t work out in our favor. We took a gamble but didn’t get the finish we were hoping for.”

- AJ Allmendinger

 

Daniel Hemric, No. 11 Cirkul Chevrolet

Start: 10th

Stage 1 finish: 12th

Stage 2 finish: 16th

Finish: 17th

 

 

"Kaulig Racing has been working hard trying to find the right direction to advance our program forward, and we took some pretty big swings this weekend. We fought the same subtle things we’ve fought all year. Obviously, we still have some work to do. Our strategy didn’t pan out, and we didn’t get the finish we deserve. We will carry on to next week.”

 

 

- Daniel Hemric

 

Landon Cassill, No. 10 Voyager Chevrolet

Start: 12th

Stage 1 finish: 13th

Stage 2 finish: 18th

Finish: 18th

"I really liked our strategy, but it just didn’t work out. I felt like the way last run was going, there was potential for cautions with 15 or 20 laps to go. With new tires we would have had a really good advantage, and undoubtedly, would have had a top-five finish. It just didn’t work out our favor.”

 

 

- Landon Cassill

Kaulig Racing PR

The long-awaited revival of North Wilkesboro Speedway later this year will include the Solid Rock Carriers CARS Tour.

Wrapping up a busy August at the historic track will be a Late Model Stock Car race sanctioned by the CARS Tour, in which the series regulars and a few other notable names will battle it out for the opportunity to add a North Wilkesboro victory to their resume.

Planning out a race at North Wilkesboro has been a long, meticulous process for CARS Tour owner Jack McNelly and director of operations Keeley Dubensky. Now that all the details have been sorted with XR Events CEO Barry Braun, Dubensky is eager to see drivers on track for what she believes will be one of the most storied events in the history of Late Model Stock Car competition.

“We are overwhelmed with the amount of support from our competitors and fans,” Dubensky said. “The nostalgia and excitement surrounding this event speaks for itself. I’m excited to introduce Barry and his team to our Late Model Stock program and put our heads together to create something special for everyone to enjoy and remember for years to come.”

The inaugural visit to North Wilkesboro for the CARS LMSC Tour will count towards the championship.

A full entry list of 30 cars has already been established for the feature, but the actual race structure has yet to be determined. Dubensky added that the starting grid could be expanded to include 38 cars but doing so would reduce the number of laps from 125 to 75 to conserve tires.

The CARS LMSC Tour drivers automatically locked into North Wilkesboro include every Touring 12 member as well as those who have competed in all six races so far. Positions in the field have also been secured by a handful of outsiders, whose inclusion will be announced within the next couple of months.

On-track activities for the CARS LMSC Tour are going to take place over the course of two days. Details on the schedule are still being finalized, but Dubensky would prefer to have practice and qualifying during the day on Aug. 30 prior to holding the feature on Aug. 31.

Simply making plans for a race at North Wilkesboro was something that McNelly thought to be impossible just a couple of years ago. He is grateful for all the strenuous effort put in by XR Events to make the event happen and is ready to see how the track races after a decade of being dormant.

“We’re looking forward to being an integral part of this event,” McNelly said. “We’re eager to work with XR Events and all of us are excited to showcase our series and its competitors on a big stage.”

Dubensky and McNelly intend to iron out a full plan for the CARS LMSC Tour race with Braun, who is excited to have the series on an itinerary that includes races for Touring Modifieds, the CRA Super Series and the Super Cup Stock Car Series.

With the old pavement at North Wilkesboro set to be removed in September, Braun said that ending the month with a CARS LMSC Tour race is an appropriate way to honor the history of the facility while simultaneously ushering in a new era for racing.

“The CARS Tour at North Wilkesboro will be the perfect fit to wrap up the pavement racing month,” Braun said. “It is a perfect mix of grassroots racing and legends to cap the revitalization of this historic track.”

Anticipation will only build for the CARS LMSC Tour’s first visit to North Wilkesboro ahead of the green flag, which will fly on a talented field of drivers on Aug. 31 at approximately 7 p.m..

For more information on the CARS Late Model Stock Tour and the CARS Pro Late Model Tour, visit www.carsracingtour.com. Be sure to stay active and social with the tour by liking “CARS Tour” on Facebook, following @CARSTour on Twitter and scrolling through photos on Instagram cars_tour.

Additional series information can be obtained by calling the CARS Tour series office, located in Mooresville, NC, at 704.662.9212.

CARS Tour PR

Race Notes:

- Daniel Dye returned to Elko Speedway on Saturday for the ARCA Menards Series, Menards 250.

- Dye started the 250-lap event in fourth and ran inside the top four almost the entire event.

- Daniel brought the Martech Services Company No. 43 Chevrolet home in the fifth position.

DD Quote:

"Elko was another challenge for me tonight with our Martech Services Chevy. We had a fast car but just struggled to find the balance we needed from early to late in the runs. I can't thank everyone at GMS enough for their hard work today and to the Martech group for coming to the track and showing so much support."

Next:

Florida Sunbelt Series Race 3
Clyde Hart Memorial 100
Saturday, July 2, 2022
New Symrna Speedway
New Symrna Beach, FL
(No live coverage)

Daniel Dye PR

THE MODERATOR: We're now going to roll into our post-race press conference here at Nashville Superspeedway, and we've been joined by today's winning crew chief Alan Gustafson for today's Ally 400. Alan, before we roll straight into questions, it has been a long day. From a crew chief standpoint you guys had a lot of things to navigate, from lightning holds to actual rain and red flags and then just the racing part of it. Just from your seat today, tell us a little bit about what that looked like before having the opportunity to celebrate with your team in Victory Lane.

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I think for us we were super optimistic coming in. We had a pretty good car on Friday practice and qualified decent and had some track position. I felt good about it and didn't start the race very good, and the car wasn't driving great.

I had a lot of work to do and started to work on the car, then had a pit stop issue which kind of got us behind but ultimately helped because we had an opportunity to work on the car a little bit more and from then on I think the car was in a good position and driving really well so we were able to make up ground.

The rain delays and lightning delays, certainly there's nothing we can do about that. We just had to work through it and stay focused and use that to our advantage to have a plan to move forward and execute.

Yeah, once we got back through that rain, our car was really good and competitive, and we executed well.

I think from then on, it was kind of the tale of two races for us. We were the Bad News Bears at the start and then at the end we got it right and were really good.

Q. My question is with the tire wear, how did it wear comparing the day part of the race to the night part of the race, and how much did that influence your call to stay out for Elliott?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, the tire wear wasn't really an issue for us. Our tire wear was good. The falloff was less certainly at night. You could see the lap time falloff was less, and that played into the end.

I think regardless in that circumstance, we were probably going to stay out, but certainly the fact that the falloff was less as the track cooled down contributed some.

Q. What was the penalty for?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Did we get a penalty?

Q. That's what Chase keeps saying.

ALAN GUSTAFSON: No, I think we just went to the back on our own accord.

Q. You had a long -- made some changes on pit road?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Well, we had the potential loose wheel so we backed him up in the stall, tightened the wheel to make sure it was okay and obviously we were going to be at the back at that point in time so we came in and worked on the car a little bit more handling-wise, chassis-wise.

Q. He said you guys were able to make a lot of changes during the rain --

ALAN GUSTAFSON: We had changed -- I can't remember if -- I thought that pit stop issue was before the rain. It was before the rain. No, we had made all of our changes to that point, and then ultimately never got too much chance to show it. We went to the back and we were like 16th at the rain delay.

Q. So he's completely confused --

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, a little bit but we won't call him out too bad.

Q. So you guys stay out, all the guys racing for the win come in. Did the nine other guys staying out put the separation --

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Absolutely, yeah, that was the difference. I think the 18 for sure -- the 19 was really good. The 18 was really good. The 18 was really fast on the short runs, so if he lines up anywhere near us on new tires it's game over.

Yeah, he just -- my expectation was he wasn't going to get that close and I felt like there was going to be tough -- there typically is, there's enough chaos in front of you that you just can't go anyway, so that's what we were hoping for.

Ultimately there was -- I guess you said nine or whatever, ten, there were -- when I saw, there was four or five legit good cars, guys that weren't going to be easy to pass. When I saw that, I felt better.

You never know.

But then you can't just say, oh, Kyle. You've got to switch your focus to Kurt. He's no slouch; the guy is a great race car driver. He just won at Kansas, and that team has been doing really well. So you've got Kurt and you've got Kyle Larson and Ryan, all those guys super good drivers and good teams. Had to execute regardless.

Q. You get points in both stages, you get some more playoff points with the win. You're still in position of course to get the 15 for the regular season championship. What does this win do in moving towards that goal, other than not getting the stage wins you kind of got everything tonight.

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, that's the position we're in right now. I think most of the guys, whatever, the 12 certainly that have won are focusing on that. That's kind of the key now is to get as many playoff points as you can so you position yourself as best as possible when it reracks because anything can happen. There's still a lot of time between now and then.

We're obviously working to win every race, but when you're there, yeah, the points are -- points and playoff points are the focus.

Q. Is that a goal to the point where that's part of your strategy planning every week, or do you just stay on offense and just hope for the best?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I wish it was a bit more glamorous, but that's kind of what I try to do every week. If you're leading the points or wherever you're at, you're trying to win, and you're trying to win stages and you're trying to lead laps and have the best car possible.

Yeah, are we in a position to maybe take a few more gambles now than we would have if we were somebody else? Certainly, but I don't think it's significantly different.

Q. Alan, I don't mean to drudge up bad memories when you're kind of riding the high of a victory --

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Of course you don't. So let's not do it. Next. Are you going to ask me about Charlotte?

Q. Yes. So you know what the scenario was. Was that in the back of your mind when that caution came out and you had to make the decision whether to stay out and hope everyone else behind you -- hope enough other drivers stayed out and be able to stay out front or come in and risk everyone else staying out?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I mean, it's how you -- anything you do in life is based on your experiences, right, everything you do. So certainly that factors into the decisions I make. Unfortunately the bad ones are the ones that always get brought up, but all the good ones factor into my decision making process, too.

I don't know, did I think about Charlotte? Do I think about Charlotte? Do I get reminded about Charlotte? Yes, I do, unfortunately. Was it a huge influence on what we had to do here? Not really.

Q. Were there any other times in the past where you elected to stay out and it worked out? Just so we don't keep drudging up bad memories.

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, a lot of them. I can't think off the top of my head. Probably the coolest one was with Mark Martin at Loudon, whenever that was.

Q. 1832?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: I don't know, there's certainly ones that I've stayed out and won. I won a race with Kyle at Phoenix staying out, so yeah. I could go through the Rolodex here, but there's quite a few that's happened. I won Dover with Chase staying out. How about that one? We've got a few.

Q. There was a restart where Chase passed like five cars in half a lap. Can you give us your perspective on that?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I felt like that was kind of the moment in the race I was like, all right, we should win this race. Ultimately I didn't feel like we were going to pass the 19 -- sorry, 18 and 19 at the time on equal ground, so I wanted to get off sequence with them there, and when I did, not as many people pitted as I had hoped so we were a little bit further back, and he got back to what you're referencing, fourth or fifth, in no time. I was like, this gives us a huge advantage.

I think it's a testament to how good the 19 was. It really took us a long time to pass him, but then certainly we got past him, were able to track Kyle down in pretty quick order there. Yeah, that was a big deal. Restarts typically aren't our forte and our strength, and Chase did an amazing job of that, and that was really kind of the first indication -- I knew we were getting better, you just don't know how good you are because we weren't really in the best track position, and that was the first indication, I was like, all right, this thing is pretty good.

Q. Chase isn't really known for that kind of aggression. Did that take your breath away a little bit?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: As far as, yeah, you're like, here we go. Like you said, he's not conservative at all, but he's just a guy, he's a very calculated driver and doesn't put himself in bad positions. When I knew he had that much confidence in the car, then I knew it was that good.

Q. I know you've talked about points, but this gives you 13 playoff points and you're tied with Byron and Chastain now for first, which I know is -- you've still got nine races to go in the regular season, but where does that position you? Does it give you some confidence for the championship hunt?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I just think it's too early. Look, it's good. You want to be the best at everything. You want to be the first in all the metrics that matter, and certainly that's what we strive to do. But it's just early. It's just a long way to go. I don't know that the landscape is right now how it's going to be. We've just got to keep winning, accumulating points and put ourselves in the position to score as many points as possible and try to win the regular season and just stack them up. You don't know. Certainly the Gibbs cars have been running a lot better, and who knows where it's going to go in the future. We've just got to do everything we can to stay on top.

Q. I know it was in comparison to the fairgrounds when you had fears of a snoozefest here. What kind of racing do you feel like this track has given you guys, and was tonight exciting in that way?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: I like boring races that we lead every lap, so I'm probably the wrong guy to ask. That's up to you guys to decide. I want to make it as boring as I possibly can.

Q. There's been so much talk about this car can go to widely variant types of tracks compared to what you guys used to do. Obviously you won at Dover, you win here at concrete. Was this the same car? Were things able to carry over or was this a car that was run on the Bristol dirt or something?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: I have no idea to be honest with you. I don't know. They're all -- we don't look at them the way we used to and categorize them for certain types of tracks. It very well could have raced anywhere. I have no idea.

Q. Do you feel you are -- where do you feel you are in understanding this car and able to calculate what to do in terms of adjustments or look ahead as opposed to just trying to react?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I mean, it's still early. We're still learning things. I feel like we came here with a little bit different philosophy from what we've been running. We had the off weekend to kind of work through it, so this isn't our typical package. It's slightly different. It's fairly different from Dover. I don't know if it was better or worse, but it ran well.

Yeah, I think everybody -- my fear is everybody, there's not a ton of adjustment in the car, so everybody is going to kind of drive down into the bottom right corner. It's just eventually everybody is going to get to a very, very similar place through experience and guys that are good at what they do.

I don't know that we've tapped everything, all the opportunity to get the car to drive good or get an advantage, so we'll keep working on it, but I hope that we can keep opening up new ways to get performance out of the car, because if not I think everybody is going to get pretty close pretty quickly.

Q. Is it too early to see trends, or is everything just bouncing from week to week and nothing makes sense yet?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Well, I think everybody can draw their own trend line they want to. To me it's not -- just like there was tonight, there's probably a legit pick your number, eight or so cars that can win the race, and the team that executes that the best and puts themselves in position at the end wins. I don't feel like there's really been a dominant car in a race all season really that I can think of.

Q. With the two long delays, how do you keep the team motivated and focused and the driver, as well?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: So the team, we just kind of came off a rough start, so everybody was pretty honed in. You just feel like you had just taken a beating so you were pretty much ready to avenge that.

For Chase, I felt like I needed to instill a little confidence in him that the car was improving and we were getting where we wanted to be. It didn't take much, but I talked to him a little bit and just said, hey, with the way the car is driving, the way the lap times are and as ground as we made, even the restart when we went to the back before the rain delay, we had made some pretty good ground. I was like, look, we've got a really good shot here. We've got to stay focused. He's pretty easy. It's not hard.

But yeah, I didn't want him to -- I know he's in the car and driving hard and things happen and it's super easy to get frustrated and super easy to think things are going to go bad, and where he's at obviously based on what he's talking about he doesn't know the whole story all the time.

I just wanted to make sure that he knew that hey, I was pretty confident we were going the right direction, we were going to be in position to do what we needed to do.

Q. He said on Friday he was saying how (indiscernible) uses his positive thinking --

ALAN GUSTAFSON: I love that. We talked about that a little bit today.

Q. He does not think he's a positive thinker, so how is it not hard for you to rebuild his confidence?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: I don't feel like I was rebuilding his confidence. I was just basically trying to say, hey, we're not going to screw it up anymore, go do your job. That was kind of it. So my philosophy as a crew chief has always been the same. My goal is to always make the driver the weak link. If he's the weak link, then I've done my job, the team has done their job.

With him it's not an easy thing to do because he's a pretty strong link and obviously other guys that I've worked with. So that's what I try to do. That was a little bit more of what I was describing is I was trying to say to him, hey -- the word I was going to use I'm not going to use. We're done messing up and we're going to get after it, so stick with us, bring your A game, all will be good.

THE MODERATOR: Alan, thank you for spending some time with us. We appreciate it. You are free to go.

NASCAR PR

THE MODERATOR: We're going to continue now with our post-race press conference for today and tonight's Ally 400. We've now been joined by our race winner, Chase Elliott, driver of the No. 9 NAPA Chevrolet for Hendrick Motorsports. Congratulations on the win, Chase. We appreciate you spending some time with us.

Q. How tough was it to maintain your focus during all those stops and starts and delays?

CHASE ELLIOTT: You know, it wasn't too bad. I feel like we've had that a good bit over the last few years since they implemented the lightning thing. I didn't think it was too difficult.

Q. How special is this considering your closeness to Nashville, your dad racing at the fairgrounds?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, look, I wish we were at the fairgrounds, for example, but I'm glad we're at least in the market. This is a cool town. It's a great place to be. It's a great place to race. It's a town that I think embraces us, and we embrace the people that are here, and they stuck it out. Heck, the crowd was still pretty good I thought for it to be 11:00 at night or whatever and having started this thing six or seven hours ago.

Yeah, I thought we had a good crowd. Appreciate everybody sticking around, and it is close to home for me, so -- it's hard to win anywhere, but when you win kind of close to home like that, it is pretty special.

Q. What about after last year's disappointing race?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, I think the biggest thing was we just struggled here last year, so to have a struggle race here a year ago and then to be able to come back and be as competitive as we were in the second half of the race, I am the most proud of that piece of the puzzle, I think.

Just to kind of reset and be able to reevaluate and get back going the right direction here.

Q. I know you were talking relative to the fairgrounds a couple years ago saying snoozefest here, but you've been through a couple of races here now. How do you feel like this track has stacked up as far as that, especially tonight?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, I didn't think the race was terrible tonight. At least we could get up off the bottom and move around, which I thought was encouraging. I was even more surprised that we still moved up after the sun went down. I thought at that point it was going to be really one lane, and it really wasn't. You could still be in at least a couple different lanes. It was way more racy than I thought it would be.

But it still doesn't mean I prefer this over the fairgrounds and what that could be.

I don't want people to get a sour taste about that. It's just that racetrack and the history of that racetrack and its location is just something that we're never going to replicate again. For the most part all these facilities that we have are 45 minutes to an hour outside whatever said market is we're trying to reach. If it's Michigan or here or Atlanta is 30, 45 minutes south of the city. All these places we go, Homestead is an hour outside Miami. All these places we go you're drawing from an area that is 45 minutes to an hour away. With the fairgrounds you'd be drawing from an area that is 15 blocks away or so.

Correct me if I'm wrong on that, but it's a hell of a lot closer than it is here, and that's just not something that in today's society, you're never going to build a racetrack in a city like that again. That's why I think as an industry we need to take advantage of that. We don't need to let that place die. I know they built that big soccer stadium right next door, but use that as positivity because the infrastructure is now there to house all the people. Now they have ideas and ways to get people in and out.

It's too good of a place, too good of an opportunity for us to not be utilizing that in my opinion. I think it would be the best location and best event of the year if they could pull that off.

Q. Was your fear at the time that since you were going to be racing here that you may not be racing there, when actually it is possible you might?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yes, for sure. I still worry about that a little bit. But it sounds like they're at least working on it. Unfortunately I can't do a ton other than just voice my support for it.

I understand all the different sides of the puzzle there, and I respect that. But selfishly for us, I think it would be a great event.

Look, they're already racing there. Folks seem to be doing just fine with the races that are going on, and you'd be talking about one big event there a year for us to come and be a part of it.

I think the positives outweigh the negatives, and I think there's a way to be respectful in doing so of the folks that live in the area and be able to do it in a positive light.

Q. Chase, is it enjoyable to win a race where you have some problems, you kind of go off the radar screen, the JGR cars led 250 of 300 laps, so they were kind of going, all right, one of us is going to snag this thing and then you end up winning. Is it fun to win kind of off the radar?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, look, it's fun to win regardless I feel like. But yeah, I was really proud of a couple things. One, proud of having the past month and a half, two months that we've had been horrendous. I've crashed about 10 times and we've had a lot of stuff happen to end up having bad finishes, and you never want that, especially when it's -- well, any time, whether it's in a string of races or not, you don't want that, period. So proud to be able to bounce back from a really rough stretch.

And then proud to have struggled as bad as we did -- as bad as we were at the beginning of the race, to be able to adjust on it, take advantage of the opportunities we had to try to fix it and then to hit on it and be able to execute on it after we hit on it to be able to finish the event strong is not an easy thing to do.

Our team I feel like they do a great job when everybody is pulling in the same direction and is executing and doing their jobs to the best of their ability. I feel like we're as good as anybody, and tonight I felt like they really show cased their talents, not just on pit road with their pit stops being really solid but Alan and Tom making really good adjustments and just staying on top of everything, so it was a good team win.

Q. As far as the points, you got stage points, you obviously get a big chunk for winning. You're now plus 30 over Chastain, 31 over Blaney, 47 over Kyle. How do you look at that gap with nine races to go?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Well, I mean, I feel like no gap is safe. We had a pretty big one there at one point, and that can go away in a hurry.

Look, you just have to keep bringing strong race cars to the racetrack. You have to keep putting yourself in position to win. When you're battling up front and you have shots to win, the points thing is going to take care of itself. You might be faced if you can achieve the first part of that, you might be faced with a situation here or there where you have to decide whether or not you want to get stage points or whether or not you want to try to go for the race win, and those things are -- that's just part of the world we live in now with stages.

But more so on road courses, I guess, than anything. The best way to look at it is just trying to be fighting for wins, and if we're doing that, I think the points thing will kind of take care of itself.

Q. The restart where you picked up like five positions in like a half a lap or a lap, I asked Alan about that and he said that was the point at which I thought we've got the car to win this race, we've got to win this race. Your perspective on that, and when you made that move did you know that was when you had the car to win?

CHASE ELLIOTT: I felt like -- honestly there, I felt like our balance was good at least when we had our penalty and we went to the back, and I was able to run some different lanes that I had not had the ability to run prior to that. When that ability showed up for me, I thought, okay, now I think we're in the ballpark.

Then as the race went on, the restart thing, like you put anybody in the right situation and you can look like a hero. I don't think there's anything special I did. You can take a car that isn't balanced as well as what ours was tonight and have the right lane choice and the right guys get bottled up at the right time, and you pass three or four of them.

So I don't necessarily think that was the turning point for me. I feel like it was more just a balance thing and feeling like we had got it really close. Then from there just trying to execute and have good restarts up front and have good pit stops.

Q. You can give yourself some credit, though. It looked like a video game type move.

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, it worked out. I feel like a lot of guys do that when people get bottled up off the corner and you have a head of steam. The lanes just kind of opened up for me, so it wasn't anything spectacular on my end. I just kind of went where the options were.

Q. Following up on the points thing, beyond just having the lead in the points standings, you're also now tied for playoff points lead with Byron and Chastain with 13 playoff points. Do you feel like you're positioned pretty well? With all this talk about guys are going to fall out in the first round who we're not expecting, it seems like you're getting a little bit of a cushion.

CHASE ELLIOTT: Well, you want more than that for sure. I don't think any cushion is safe in the playoff thing unless you have six or seven wins like some guys have over the last couple years. At that point then you're probably feeling much better about it.

But I don't think two and just a couple stage wins is going to give you the confidence to make dumb decisions in the beginning of the playoffs.

Look, I think everybody is vulnerable when the playoffs start. Especially as the rounds progress. We have seen guys with those big cushions not make the last round. So I don't think anything is guaranteed. You certainly want to hedge your bet in that direction as much as you can, and every win helps that, every stage win helps that. That's something I want to achieve.

We've never really put ourselves in a position like that to where we have a big cushion and we're able to kind of cruise through rounds. I feel like we've always had to scratch and claw for each found, which is fine, and I'm okay with that, but it would be nice to rack up some wins and hedge your bet more so for a potential bad day or something out of your hands.

Q. Chase, now that we've had two races in Nashville, where exactly does this race rank among the competitors in terms of races that are coveted and the drivers want to win? Obviously Nashville doesn't really have the recent history in NASCAR since there was a long gap between 1980s and last year, so it's not necessarily like the Southern 500, the 600 in Charlotte, what have you, but it's pretty quickly become a destination race. There's a lot of hype around it. Obviously the market is big, kind of like Las Vegas is almost. Obviously everyone also wants the Gibson guitar when you win this race. Where exactly does it rank?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, I mean, I think it just depends on what your personal thoughts are on the city or whatever, but I've enjoyed coming to Nashville. It's been one of my favorite towns for a number of years. I have raced at the fairgrounds and had some special memories over there.

Yeah, it's special to me because of that. But I don't really know where it ranks amongst everyone. For me, every win is important and special to me because they're really hard to get. I don't take any of them for granted, so they're all big in my opinion. They're too hard to win to not appreciate them in a pretty high regard.

Q. Before the 2022 season you had zero wins on concrete. Now you won at Dover and Nashville. What with the Next-Gen setup and concrete tracks have you kind of found that you've found this recent success on concrete tracks?

CHASE ELLIOTT: You know, to be honest with you, I don't know that it has anything to do with the Next-Gen thing. I feel like we've had good runs in the past at Bristol and Dover, and not necessarily here, but at least at Bristol and Dover, to where we've had shots at winning and haven't.

But look, you get the right day, the right circumstance and the right car balance and everything goes your way, you can -- I feel like our team can have a shot. Fortunately today was that way for us and we were able to get it done.

Q. How much say, thought, anything, do you have in staying out or pitting on that last caution?

CHASE ELLIOTT: I mean, I let Alan do his thing. He lets me do my thing, so I'm going to let him do his and just have confidence in that. It doesn't do me any good to not.

When I start questioning his decisions, I feel like is when we start going down a road that is not favorable for success. He has had a lot of respect for me and let me do my job and let me approach things a pretty unique way and kind of be me, so I've always respected him in return and let him do his thing and just had confidence in whatever that decision is.

Q. When you walked in he was answering a question about how he keeps the team motivated and the driver motivated during those long weather delays. He said because the car had been so off at the start that the team was no problem, but that he did need to have a talk with you. What do you do during the delays, and how did that talk go between the two of you?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, it was straightforward. I think really we just talked about our balance, honestly. We just talked about where we were at the start of the day, what we did in practice on Friday, how we landed in the position we landed in to start the event, why we chose that and why it wasn't working.

We tried to diagnose that to the best of our abilities, make a decision on which way we wanted to go, and we did that, and fortunately it was the right decision.

Just had dialogue about the car. I feel like when you get in those situations or whatever it may be, look, if it's not going to make you go any faster it's probably not worth talking about. Talking about those things and how we ended up where we did is a fruitful thing to do in that time period.

That's what we did. I think probably what a lot of people do. It wasn't anything spectacular or really special, but we were able to just kind of talk through some of that and go back in a direction that worked for us, and unfortunately the condition changing and our adjustments ended up in a really good spot.

Q. Did you feel okay or were you like, today is terrible?

CHASE ELLIOTT: No, I felt okay. At the beginning of the race, no. I felt like we were really, really off. Then after we had our penalty, like I was -- I'm sorry, yeah, whatever it was. Yeah, our extended stay on pit road, how about that. We started in the back. So after we started in the back and I was able to run some different lanes that I hadn't been able to do throughout the day, at that point I felt like, okay, we have something to work with again, our car is driving like I remember it driving on Friday, and from there we just kind of went to work and tried to execute the event the best we could.

Q. After the race, Kurt Busch was really beating himself up about the last restart. He said he kind of went soft. He said he wished he had thrown some fenders. Were you surprised that he didn't mix it up, or could he have even mixed it up in that position?

CHASE ELLIOTT: I feel like you're always going to look back and want to do something a little different. But I feel like Kurt and I raced each other with a lot of respect. Obviously we're going for the win; we're going to be aggressive. I thought he was. We went off into Turn 1 and we were both sliding up the track and then at that point I was able to get -- I got position on him off of 2, and from there I was just trying to manage my lanes, and if he was going to go in a lane that I thought might be really advantageous to him I probably would have shut it off on him anyway.

No, I thought we raced each other with respect, raced hard, and on those restarts when that one guy gets free, it's going to be very difficult for that second-place guy to time up a run without a mistake or something on a short run like that to the end.

I thought he did a good job, and it was respectful from my end. I don't know what else you could really ask for there.

Q. With about 40 to go on that restart with the 18, you were on the inside, he chose the outside. He had the lane choice, and you were able to get by him. What were you able to do or can you take me through that, and what worked for you at that point to be able to take the lead and control the race at that point?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, the 18 did it to the 19, the restart prior to that. I felt like the opportunity was there to do it, if the circumstances go your way, and fortunately they did. Once we got the lead there, it was just trying to control my gap to him, run my race, manage my tires the best I could and not lose the lead. Then hope that a caution didn't come out. I hate that it did, but it did, and fortunately it worked out for us.

Q. Then after that last caution before the pit stops, were you already thinking of what you would be doing, and I'm assuming you would have taken the high side and had the 18 on the inside? If he had stayed out it would have been the two of you on the front row again; were you already thinking about how you would have played or would you have gone to the outside for the restart?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, I was thinking the outside. I felt like there was a difference in used tires versus fresh tires. I got the lead from him on fresh tires. He got the lead from Martin on fresh tires, too, so that was the reasoning in why I did what I did.

Q. How surprised were you to see those cars pit behind you then?

CHASE ELLIOTT: I wasn't. Typically they're going to do the exact opposite of what you're doing. I feel like everybody gave Alan a lot of crap for the 600 a few years ago or whatever, but those people behind you are going to do the exact opposite of what you do. I don't know why that doesn't get through everyone's head, especially at a racetrack that has some tire wear. You're in a very vulnerable position at that point. And two, like if the caution had come out two or three more times, we probably wouldn't have won because those guys would have kept cycling themselves forward.

So you get a caution twice and before you get the white flag, and next thing you know you're sitting with a guy right behind you with four fresh tires with one lap on them, so then at that point you're wishing you pitted.

Those situations are just impossible to get right. You knowing how the outcome is going to go is absolutely -- it's unachievable, so you try to make the best decision you can make and hope the cards go your way.

Q. How comfortable are you feeling with this car? Certainly we've seen nobody has really been able to be consistently strong too many weeks. Obviously you had five straight top 10s at one point which is the longest streak of the season. What's your comfort level with this car and trying to build the consistency, and how are you dealing with it when it's different as opposed to past year when you had a higher comfort level?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, I think the difference is that the line to get it right is more thin than I think it has been in the past. So just finding comfort in living in a tighter tolerance is difficult to do.

Even though some days you might be comfortable, it's still really easy to step outside that. Look at Charlotte. I felt like I was not being very aggressive, and next thing you know I made a mistake I hit the wall and our day is over. It wasn't like at that point in time you're trying to do anything crazy in a 600-mile race, or at least I didn't think I was, and you can get yourself in a lot of trouble in a hurry in these things. Just trying to figure out where you can live and live there comfortably, how to ratchet up your performance at that right time if that is something inside your car that you can pull out of it, and if it's not, taking what's there for you and not driving over your head, because like I say, this thing is pretty unforgiving in a lot of ways.

NASCAR PR

    Chase Elliott and the No. 9 NAPA Auto Parts Camaro ZL1 team scored their second win of 2022 at Nashville Superspeedway.

·       The win is Elliott’s 15th-career victory in 238 NASCAR Cup Series starts.

·       It also marks the sixth win of 2022 for Hendrick Motorsports; and the organization’s 286th all-time in NASCAR’s premier series. 

·       Elliott is now the fifth driver this season to become a repeat winner.

·       Elliott’s triumph is the ninth of the season for the Camaro ZL1, more than double its manufacturer competitors.

·       The winningest brand in NASCAR, Chevrolet now has 823 all-time NASCAR Cup Series victories.

 

 

 

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (June 27, 2022) – Chase Elliott and the No. 9 NAPA Auto Parts Camaro ZL1 team are leaving Nashville Superspeedway with the coveted custom guitar trophy in hand after taking the checkered flag in the rain delayed Ally 400. The second win of 2022 for the Georgia native didn’t come without a fight. With an issue on pit road forcing Elliott to come from deep in the pack early in the race, Elliott’s team was able to quickly get their Chevrolet-powered machine dialed back in as a front runner in the final stage. With pit strategy playing a vital role throughout the race, Alan Gustafson (crew chief) chose track position during the final late-race caution, giving Elliott a front row spot for the restart with four laps to go. In a battle with second-place Kurt Busch to the end, it was the No. 9 NAPA Auto Parts Camaro ZL1 that came out on top marking Elliott’s 15th-career victory in NASCAR’s premier series.

 

“Just so proud of our team,” said Elliott “We kind of had a setback there about halfway and we were able to get our NAPA Chevy dialed back in and get back in the mix. We were able to work on it a little bit after the penalty and got it going a little better. My team just stuck with it. Thanks to everybody at Hendrick Motorsports. They have been working really hard over the winter and through the spring to keep up. The engines have been running great and obviously great support from Chevrolet.”

 

The win at the 1.33-mile Tennessee concrete oval is the ninth trip to victory lane for the Camaro ZL1 in the season’s 17 points-paying races; a number that is more than double its manufacturer competitors. The winningest brand in NASCAR, Chevrolet leaves Nashville Superspeedway with 823 all-time NASCAR Cup Series wins. Chase Elliott entered the race weekend on top of the NCS driver points standings; and with a win and his now 11th top-10 finish this season, the Hendrick Motorsports driver continues to hold the top spot for the 13th-consecutive week with a 30-point lead over fellow Chevrolet driver Ross Chastain.

 

Elliott led a strong bowtie presence in the top-five of the race that kicked off the 10-race stretch to the end of the series’ regular season. Elliott’s Hendrick Motorsports teammate, Kyle Larson, posted his seventh top-five finish thus far this season, driving his No. 5 HendrickCars.com Camaro ZL1 to a fourth-place finish. Ross Chastain rounded out the Team Chevy top-five in fifth, giving the No. 1 Jockey Camaro ZL1 its eighth top-five finish of 2022 on Trackhouse Racing’s home turf.

 

The NASCAR Cup Series season continues next Sunday, July 3, at Road America with the Kwik Trip 250 presented by JOCKEY Made in America at 3 p.m. ET. Live coverage can be found on USA Network, the NBCSports Gold App, MRN and SiriusXM NASCAR Radio Channel 90.

 

CHASE ELLIOTT, NO. 9 NAPA AUTO PARTS CAMARO ZL1 – PRESS CONFERENCE TRANSCRIPT:

 

THE MODERATOR: We're going to continue now with our post-race press conference for today and tonight's Ally 400. We've now been joined by our race winner, Chase Elliott, driver of the No. 9 NAPA Chevrolet for Hendrick Motorsports. Congratulations on the win, Chase. We appreciate you spending some time with us.

 

Q. How tough was it to maintain your focus during all those stops and starts and delays?

CHASE ELLIOTT: You know, it wasn't too bad. I feel like we've had that a good bit over the last few years since they implemented the lightning thing. I didn't think it was too difficult.

 

Q. How special is this considering your closeness to Nashville, your dad racing at the fairgrounds?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, look, I wish we were at the fairgrounds, for example, but I'm glad we're at least in the market. This is a cool town. It's a great place to be. It's a great place to race. It's a town that I think embraces us, and we embrace the people that are here, and they stuck it out. Heck, the crowd was still pretty good I thought for it to be 11:00 at night or whatever and having started this thing six or seven hours ago.

Yeah, I thought we had a good crowd. Appreciate everybody sticking around, and it is close to home for me, so -- it's hard to win anywhere, but when you win kind of close to home like that, it is pretty special.

 

Q. What about after last year's disappointing race?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, I think the biggest thing was we just struggled here last year, so to have a struggle race here a year ago and then to be able to come back and be as competitive as we were in the second half of the race, I am the most proud of that piece of the puzzle, I think.

Just to kind of reset and be able to reevaluate and get back going the right direction here.

 

Q. I know you were talking relative to the fairgrounds a couple years ago saying snoozefest here, but you've been through a couple of races here now. How do you feel like this track has stacked up as far as that, especially tonight?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, I didn't think the race was terrible tonight. At least we could get up off the bottom and move around, which I thought was encouraging. I was even more surprised that we still moved up after the sun went down. I thought at that point it was going to be really one lane, and it really wasn't. You could still be in at least a couple different lanes. It was way more racy than I thought it would be.

But it still doesn't mean I prefer this over the fairgrounds and what that could be.

I don't want people to get a sour taste about that. It's just that racetrack and the history of that racetrack and its location is just something that we're never going to replicate again. For the most part all these facilities that we have are 45 minutes to an hour outside whatever said market is we're trying to reach. If it's Michigan or here or Atlanta is 30, 45 minutes south of the city. All these places we go, Homestead is an hour outside Miami. All these places we go you're drawing from an area that is 45 minutes to an hour away. With the fairgrounds you'd be drawing from an area that is 15 blocks away or so.

Correct me if I'm wrong on that, but it's a hell of a lot closer than it is here, and that's just not something that in today's society, you're never going to build a racetrack in a city like that again. That's why I think as an industry we need to take advantage of that. We don't need to let that place die. I know they built that big soccer stadium right next door, but use that as positivity because the infrastructure is now there to house all the people. Now they have ideas and ways to get people in and out.

It's too good of a place, too good of an opportunity for us to not be utilizing that in my opinion. I think it would be the best location and best event of the year if they could pull that off.

 

Q. Was your fear at the time that since you were going to be racing here that you may not be racing there, when actually it is possible you might?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yes, for sure. I still worry about that a little bit. But it sounds like they're at least working on it. Unfortunately I can't do a ton other than just voice my support for it.

I understand all the different sides of the puzzle there, and I respect that. But selfishly for us, I think it would be a great event.

Look, they're already racing there. Folks seem to be doing just fine with the races that are going on, and you'd be talking about one big event there a year for us to come and be a part of it.

I think the positives outweigh the negatives, and I think there's a way to be respectful in doing so of the folks that live in the area and be able to do it in a positive light.

 

Q. Chase, is it enjoyable to win a race where you have some problems, you kind of go off the radar screen, the JGR cars led 250 of 300 laps, so they were kind of going, all right, one of us is going to snag this thing and then you end up winning. Is it fun to win kind of off the radar?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, look, it's fun to win regardless I feel like. But yeah, I was really proud of a couple things. One, proud of having the past month and a half, two months that we've had been horrendous. I've crashed about 10 times and we've had a lot of stuff happen to end up having bad finishes, and you never want that, especially when it's -- well, any time, whether it's in a string of races or not, you don't want that, period. So proud to be able to bounce back from a really rough stretch.

And then proud to have struggled as bad as we did -- as bad as we were at the beginning of the race, to be able to adjust on it, take advantage of the opportunities we had to try to fix it and then to hit on it and be able to execute on it after we hit on it to be able to finish the event strong is not an easy thing to do.

Our team I feel like they do a great job when everybody is pulling in the same direction and is executing and doing their jobs to the best of their ability. I feel like we're as good as anybody, and tonight I felt like they really show cased their talents, not just on pit road with their pit stops being really solid but Alan and Tom making really good adjustments and just staying on top of everything, so it was a good team win.

 

Q. As far as the points, you got stage points, you obviously get a big chunk for winning. You're now plus 30 over Chastain, 31 over Blaney, 47 over Kyle. How do you look at that gap with nine races to go?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Well, I mean, I feel like no gap is safe. We had a pretty big one there at one point, and that can go away in a hurry.

Look, you just have to keep bringing strong race cars to the racetrack. You have to keep putting yourself in position to win. When you're battling up front and you have shots to win, the points thing is going to take care of itself. You might be faced if you can achieve the first part of that, you might be faced with a situation here or there where you have to decide whether or not you want to get stage points or whether or not you want to try to go for the race win, and those things are -- that's just part of the world we live in now with stages.

But more so on road courses, I guess, than anything. The best way to look at it is just trying to be fighting for wins, and if we're doing that, I think the points thing will kind of take care of itself.

 

Q. The restart where you picked up like five positions in like a half a lap or a lap, I asked Alan about that and he said that was the point at which I thought we've got the car to win this race, we've got to win this race. Your perspective on that, and when you made that move did you know that was when you had the car to win?

CHASE ELLIOTT: I felt like -- honestly there, I felt like our balance was good at least when we had our penalty and we went to the back, and I was able to run some different lanes that I had not had the ability to run prior to that. When that ability showed up for me, I thought, okay, now I think we're in the ballpark.

Then as the race went on, the restart thing, like you put anybody in the right situation and you can look like a hero. I don't think there's anything special I did. You can take a car that isn't balanced as well as what ours was tonight and have the right lane choice and the right guys get bottled up at the right time, and you pass three or four of them.

So I don't necessarily think that was the turning point for me. I feel like it was more just a balance thing and feeling like we had got it really close. Then from there just trying to execute and have good restarts up front and have good pit stops.

 

Q. You can give yourself some credit, though. It looked like a video game type move.

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, it worked out. I feel like a lot of guys do that when people get bottled up off the corner and you have a head of steam. The lanes just kind of opened up for me, so it wasn't anything spectacular on my end. I just kind of went where the options were.

 

Q. Following up on the points thing, beyond just having the lead in the points standings, you're also now tied for playoff points lead with Byron and Chastain with 13 playoff points. Do you feel like you're positioned pretty well? With all this talk about guys are going to fall out in the first round who we're not expecting, it seems like you're getting a little bit of a cushion.

CHASE ELLIOTT: Well, you want more than that for sure. I don't think any cushion is safe in the playoff thing unless you have six or seven wins like some guys have over the last couple years. At that point then you're probably feeling much better about it.

But I don't think two and just a couple stage wins is going to give you the confidence to make dumb decisions in the beginning of the playoffs.

Look, I think everybody is vulnerable when the playoffs start. Especially as the rounds progress. We have seen guys with those big cushions not make the last round. So I don't think anything is guaranteed. You certainly want to hedge your bet in that direction as much as you can, and every win helps that, every stage win helps that. That's something I want to achieve.

We've never really put ourselves in a position like that to where we have a big cushion and we're able to kind of cruise through rounds. I feel like we've always had to scratch and claw for each found, which is fine, and I'm okay with that, but it would be nice to rack up some wins and hedge your bet more so for a potential bad day or something out of your hands.

 

Q. Chase, now that we've had two races in Nashville, where exactly does this race rank among the competitors in terms of races that are coveted and the drivers want to win? Obviously Nashville doesn't really have the recent history in NASCAR since there was a long gap between 1980s and last year, so it's not necessarily like the Southern 500, the 600 in Charlotte, what have you, but it's pretty quickly become a destination race. There's a lot of hype around it. Obviously the market is big, kind of like Las Vegas is almost. Obviously everyone also wants the Gibson guitar when you win this race. Where exactly does it rank?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, I mean, I think it just depends on what your personal thoughts are on the city or whatever, but I've enjoyed coming to Nashville. It's been one of my favorite towns for a number of years. I have raced at the fairgrounds and had some special memories over there.

Yeah, it's special to me because of that. But I don't really know where it ranks amongst everyone. For me, every win is important and special to me because they're really hard to get. I don't take any of them for granted, so they're all big in my opinion. They're too hard to win to not appreciate them in a pretty high regard.

 

Q. Before the 2022 season you had zero wins on concrete. Now you won at Dover and Nashville. What with the Next-Gen setup and concrete tracks have you kind of found that you've found this recent success on concrete tracks?

CHASE ELLIOTT: You know, to be honest with you, I don't know that it has anything to do with the Next-Gen thing. I feel like we've had good runs in the past at Bristol and Dover, and not necessarily here, but at least at Bristol and Dover, to where we've had shots at winning and haven't.

But look, you get the right day, the right circumstance and the right car balance and everything goes your way, you can -- I feel like our team can have a shot. Fortunately today was that way for us and we were able to get it done.

 

Q. How much say, thought, anything, do you have in staying out or pitting on that last caution?

CHASE ELLIOTT: I mean, I let Alan do his thing. He lets me do my thing, so I'm going to let him do his and just have confidence in that. It doesn't do me any good to not.

When I start questioning his decisions, I feel like is when we start going down a road that is not favorable for success. He has had a lot of respect for me and let me do my job and let me approach things a pretty unique way and kind of be me, so I've always respected him in return and let him do his thing and just had confidence in whatever that decision is.

 

Q. When you walked in he was answering a question about how he keeps the team motivated and the driver motivated during those long weather delays. He said because the car had been so off at the start that the team was no problem, but that he did need to have a talk with you. What do you do during the delays, and how did that talk go between the two of you?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, it was straightforward. I think really we just talked about our balance, honestly. We just talked about where we were at the start of the day, what we did in practice on Friday, how we landed in the position we landed in to start the event, why we chose that and why it wasn't working.

We tried to diagnose that to the best of our abilities, make a decision on which way we wanted to go, and we did that, and fortunately it was the right decision.

Just had dialogue about the car. I feel like when you get in those situations or whatever it may be, look, if it's not going to make you go any faster it's probably not worth talking about. Talking about those things and how we ended up where we did is a fruitful thing to do in that time period.

That's what we did. I think probably what a lot of people do. It wasn't anything spectacular or really special, but we were able to just kind of talk through some of that and go back in a direction that worked for us, and unfortunately the condition changing and our adjustments ended up in a really good spot.

 

Q. Did you feel okay or were you like, today is terrible?

CHASE ELLIOTT: No, I felt okay. At the beginning of the race, no. I felt like we were really, really off. Then after we had our penalty, like I was -- I'm sorry, yeah, whatever it was. Yeah, our extended stay on pit road, how about that. We started in the back. So after we started in the back and I was able to run some different lanes that I hadn't been able to do throughout the day, at that point I felt like, okay, we have something to work with again, our car is driving like I remember it driving on Friday, and from there we just kind of went to work and tried to execute the event the best we could.

 

Q. After the race, Kurt Busch was really beating himself up about the last restart. He said he kind of went soft. He said he wished he had thrown some fenders. Were you surprised that he didn't mix it up, or could he have even mixed it up in that position?

CHASE ELLIOTT: I feel like you're always going to look back and want to do something a little different. But I feel like Kurt and I raced each other with a lot of respect. Obviously we're going for the win; we're going to be aggressive. I thought he was. We went off into Turn 1 and we were both sliding up the track and then at that point I was able to get -- I got position on him off of 2, and from there I was just trying to manage my lanes, and if he was going to go in a lane that I thought might be really advantageous to him I probably would have shut it off on him anyway.

No, I thought we raced each other with respect, raced hard, and on those restarts when that one guy gets free, it's going to be very difficult for that second-place guy to time up a run without a mistake or something on a short run like that to the end.

I thought he did a good job, and it was respectful from my end. I don't know what else you could really ask for there.

 

Q. With about 40 to go on that restart with the 18, you were on the inside, he chose the outside. He had the lane choice, and you were able to get by him. What were you able to do or can you take me through that, and what worked for you at that point to be able to take the lead and control the race at that point?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, the 18 did it to the 19, the restart prior to that. I felt like the opportunity was there to do it, if the circumstances go your way, and fortunately they did. Once we got the lead there, it was just trying to control my gap to him, run my race, manage my tires the best I could and not lose the lead. Then hope that a caution didn't come out. I hate that it did, but it did, and fortunately it worked out for us.

 

Q. Then after that last caution before the pit stops, were you already thinking of what you would be doing, and I'm assuming you would have taken the high side and had the 18 on the inside? If he had stayed out it would have been the two of you on the front row again; were you already thinking about how you would have played or would you have gone to the outside for the restart?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, I was thinking the outside. I felt like there was a difference in used tires versus fresh tires. I got the lead from him on fresh tires. He got the lead from Martin on fresh tires, too, so that was the reasoning in why I did what I did.

 

Q. How surprised were you to see those cars pit behind you then?

CHASE ELLIOTT: I wasn't. Typically they're going to do the exact opposite of what you're doing. I feel like everybody gave Alan a lot of crap for the 600 a few years ago or whatever, but those people behind you are going to do the exact opposite of what you do. I don't know why that doesn't get through everyone's head, especially at a racetrack that has some tire wear. You're in a very vulnerable position at that point. And two, like if the caution had come out two or three more times, we probably wouldn't have won because those guys would have kept cycling themselves forward.

So you get a caution twice and before you get the white flag, and next thing you know you're sitting with a guy right behind you with four fresh tires with one lap on them, so then at that point you're wishing you pitted.

Those situations are just impossible to get right. You knowing how the outcome is going to go is absolutely -- it's unachievable, so you try to make the best decision you can make and hope the cards go your way.

 

Q. How comfortable are you feeling with this car? Certainly we've seen nobody has really been able to be consistently strong too many weeks. Obviously you had five straight top 10s at one point which is the longest streak of the season. What's your comfort level with this car and trying to build the consistency, and how are you dealing with it when it's different as opposed to past year when you had a higher comfort level?

CHASE ELLIOTT: Yeah, I think the difference is that the line to get it right is more thin than I think it has been in the past. So just finding comfort in living in a tighter tolerance is difficult to do.

Even though some days you might be comfortable, it's still really easy to step outside that. Look at Charlotte. I felt like I was not being very aggressive, and next thing you know I made a mistake I hit the wall and our day is over. It wasn't like at that point in time you're trying to do anything crazy in a 600-mile race, or at least I didn't think I was, and you can get yourself in a lot of trouble in a hurry in these things. Just trying to figure out where you can live and live there comfortably, how to ratchet up your performance at that right time if that is something inside your car that you can pull out of it, and if it's not, taking what's there for you and not driving over your head, because like I say, this thing is pretty unforgiving in a lot of ways.

 

 

 

ALAN GUSTAFSON, CREW CHIEF, NO. 9 NAPA AUTO PARTS CAMARO ZL1 – PRESS CONFERENCE TRANSCRIPT:

THE MODERATOR: We're now going to roll into our post-race press conference here at Nashville Superspeedway, and we've been joined by today's winning crew chief Alan Gustafson for today's Ally 400. Alan, before we roll straight into questions, it has been a long day. From a crew chief standpoint you guys had a lot of things to navigate, from lightning holds to actual rain and red flags and then just the racing part of it. Just from your seat today, tell us a little bit about what that looked like before having the opportunity to celebrate with your team in Victory Lane.

 

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I think for us we were super optimistic coming in. We had a pretty good car on Friday practice and qualified decent and had some track position. I felt good about it and didn't start the race very good, and the car wasn't driving great.

I had a lot of work to do and started to work on the car, then had a pit stop issue which kind of got us behind but ultimately helped because we had an opportunity to work on the car a little bit more and from then on I think the car was in a good position and driving really well so we were able to make up ground.

The rain delays and lightning delays, certainly there's nothing we can do about that. We just had to work through it and stay focused and use that to our advantage to have a plan to move forward and execute.

Yeah, once we got back through that rain, our car was really good and competitive, and we executed well.

I think from then on, it was kind of the tale of two races for us. We were the Bad News Bears at the start and then at the end we got it right and were really good.

 

Q. My question is with the tire wear, how did it wear comparing the day part of the race to the night part of the race, and how much did that influence your call to stay out for Elliott?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, the tire wear wasn't really an issue for us. Our tire wear was good. The falloff was less certainly at night. You could see the lap time falloff was less, and that played into the end.

I think regardless in that circumstance, we were probably going to stay out, but certainly the fact that the falloff was less as the track cooled down contributed some.

 

Q. What was the penalty for?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Did we get a penalty?

 

Q. That's what Chase keeps saying.

ALAN GUSTAFSON: No, I think we just went to the back on our own accord.

 

Q. You had a long -- made some changes on pit road?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Well, we had the potential loose wheel so we backed him up in the stall, tightened the wheel to make sure it was okay and obviously we were going to be at the back at that point in time so we came in and worked on the car a little bit more handling-wise, chassis-wise.

 

Q. He said you guys were able to make a lot of changes during the rain --

ALAN GUSTAFSON: We had changed -- I can't remember if -- I thought that pit stop issue was before the rain. It was before the rain. No, we had made all of our changes to that point, and then ultimately never got too much chance to show it. We went to the back and we were like 16th at the rain delay.

 

Q. So he's completely confused --

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, a little bit but we won't call him out too bad.

 

Q. So you guys stay out, all the guys racing for the win come in. Did the nine other guys staying out put the separation --

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Absolutely, yeah, that was the difference. I think the 18 for sure -- the 19 was really good. The 18 was really good. The 18 was really fast on the short runs, so if he lines up anywhere near us on new tires it's game over.

Yeah, he just -- my expectation was he wasn't going to get that close and I felt like there was going to be tough -- there typically is, there's enough chaos in front of you that you just can't go anyway, so that's what we were hoping for.

Ultimately there was -- I guess you said nine or whatever, ten, there were -- when I saw, there was four or five legit good cars, guys that weren't going to be easy to pass. When I saw that, I felt better.

You never know.

But then you can't just say, oh, Kyle. You've got to switch your focus to Kurt. He's no slouch; the guy is a great race car driver. He just won at Kansas, and that team has been doing really well. So you've got Kurt and you've got Kyle Larson and Ryan, all those guys super good drivers and good teams. Had to execute regardless.

 

Q. You get points in both stages, you get some more playoff points with the win. You're still in position of course to get the 15 for the regular season championship. What does this win do in moving towards that goal, other than not getting the stage wins you kind of got everything tonight.

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, that's the position we're in right now. I think most of the guys, whatever, the 12 certainly that have won are focusing on that. That's kind of the key now is to get as many playoff points as you can so you position yourself as best as possible when it reracks because anything can happen. There's still a lot of time between now and then.

We're obviously working to win every race, but when you're there, yeah, the points are -- points and playoff points are the focus.

 

Q. Is that a goal to the point where that's part of your strategy planning every week, or do you just stay on offense and just hope for the best?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I wish it was a bit more glamorous, but that's kind of what I try to do every week. If you're leading the points or wherever you're at, you're trying to win, and you're trying to win stages and you're trying to lead laps and have the best car possible.

Yeah, are we in a position to maybe take a few more gambles now than we would have if we were somebody else? Certainly, but I don't think it's significantly different.

 

Q. Alan, I don't mean to drudge up bad memories when you're kind of riding the high of a victory --

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Of course you don't. So let's not do it. Next. Are you going to ask me about Charlotte?

 

Q. Yes. So you know what the scenario was. Was that in the back of your mind when that caution came out and you had to make the decision whether to stay out and hope everyone else behind you -- hope enough other drivers stayed out and be able to stay out front or come in and risk everyone else staying out?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I mean, it's how you -- anything you do in life is based on your experiences, right, everything you do. So certainly that factors into the decisions I make. Unfortunately the bad ones are the ones that always get brought up, but all the good ones factor into my decision making process, too.

I don't know, did I think about Charlotte? Do I think about Charlotte? Do I get reminded about Charlotte? Yes, I do, unfortunately. Was it a huge influence on what we had to do here? Not really.

 

Q. Were there any other times in the past where you elected to stay out and it worked out? Just so we don't keep drudging up bad memories.

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, a lot of them. I can't think off the top of my head. Probably the coolest one was with Mark Martin at Loudon, whenever that was.

 

Q. 1832?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: I don't know, there's certainly ones that I've stayed out and won. I won a race with Kyle at Phoenix staying out, so yeah. I could go through the Rolodex here, but there's quite a few that's happened. I won Dover with Chase staying out. How about that one? We've got a few.

 

Q. There was a restart where Chase passed like five cars in half a lap. Can you give us your perspective on that?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I felt like that was kind of the moment in the race I was like, all right, we should win this race. Ultimately I didn't feel like we were going to pass the 19 -- sorry, 18 and 19 at the time on equal ground, so I wanted to get off sequence with them there, and when I did, not as many people pitted as I had hoped so we were a little bit further back, and he got back to what you're referencing, fourth or fifth, in no time. I was like, this gives us a huge advantage.

I think it's a testament to how good the 19 was. It really took us a long time to pass him, but then certainly we got past him, were able to track Kyle down in pretty quick order there. Yeah, that was a big deal. Restarts typically aren't our forte and our strength, and Chase did an amazing job of that, and that was really kind of the first indication -- I knew we were getting better, you just don't know how good you are because we weren't really in the best track position, and that was the first indication, I was like, all right, this thing is pretty good.

 

Q. Chase isn't really known for that kind of aggression. Did that take your breath away a little bit?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: As far as, yeah, you're like, here we go. Like you said, he's not conservative at all, but he's just a guy, he's a very calculated driver and doesn't put himself in bad positions. When I knew he had that much confidence in the car, then I knew it was that good.

 

Q. I know you've talked about points, but this gives you 13 playoff points and you're tied with Byron and Chastain now for first, which I know is -- you've still got nine races to go in the regular season, but where does that position you? Does it give you some confidence for the championship hunt?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I just think it's too early. Look, it's good. You want to be the best at everything. You want to be the first in all the metrics that matter, and certainly that's what we strive to do. But it's just early. It's just a long way to go. I don't know that the landscape is right now how it's going to be. We've just got to keep winning, accumulating points and put ourselves in the position to score as many points as possible and try to win the regular season and just stack them up. You don't know. Certainly the Gibbs cars have been running a lot better, and who knows where it's going to go in the future. We've just got to do everything we can to stay on top.

 

Q. I know it was in comparison to the fairgrounds when you had fears of a snoozefest here. What kind of racing do you feel like this track has given you guys, and was tonight exciting in that way?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: I like boring races that we lead every lap, so I'm probably the wrong guy to ask. That's up to you guys to decide. I want to make it as boring as I possibly can.

 

Q. There's been so much talk about this car can go to widely variant types of tracks compared to what you guys used to do. Obviously you won at Dover, you win here at concrete. Was this the same car? Were things able to carry over or was this a car that was run on the Bristol dirt or something?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: I have no idea to be honest with you. I don't know. They're all -- we don't look at them the way we used to and categorize them for certain types of tracks. It very well could have raced anywhere. I have no idea.

 

Q. Do you feel you are -- where do you feel you are in understanding this car and able to calculate what to do in terms of adjustments or look ahead as opposed to just trying to react?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Yeah, I mean, it's still early. We're still learning things. I feel like we came here with a little bit different philosophy from what we've been running. We had the off weekend to kind of work through it, so this isn't our typical package. It's slightly different. It's fairly different from Dover. I don't know if it was better or worse, but it ran well.

Yeah, I think everybody -- my fear is everybody, there's not a ton of adjustment in the car, so everybody is going to kind of drive down into the bottom right corner. It's just eventually everybody is going to get to a very, very similar place through experience and guys that are good at what they do.

I don't know that we've tapped everything, all the opportunity to get the car to drive good or get an advantage, so we'll keep working on it, but I hope that we can keep opening up new ways to get performance out of the car, because if not I think everybody is going to get pretty close pretty quickly.

 

Q. Is it too early to see trends, or is everything just bouncing from week to week and nothing makes sense yet?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: Well, I think everybody can draw their own trend line they want to. To me it's not -- just like there was tonight, there's probably a legit pick your number, eight or so cars that can win the race, and the team that executes that the best and puts themselves in position at the end wins. I don't feel like there's really been a dominant car in a race all season really that I can think of.

 

Q. With the two long delays, how do you keep the team motivated and focused and the driver, as well?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: So the team, we just kind of came off a rough start, so everybody was pretty honed in. You just feel like you had just taken a beating so you were pretty much ready to avenge that.

For Chase, I felt like I needed to instill a little confidence in him that the car was improving and we were getting where we wanted to be. It didn't take much, but I talked to him a little bit and just said, hey, with the way the car is driving, the way the lap times are and as ground as we made, even the restart when we went to the back before the rain delay, we had made some pretty good ground. I was like, look, we've got a really good shot here. We've got to stay focused. He's pretty easy. It's not hard.

But yeah, I didn't want him to -- I know he's in the car and driving hard and things happen and it's super easy to get frustrated and super easy to think things are going to go bad, and where he's at obviously based on what he's talking about he doesn't know the whole story all the time.

I just wanted to make sure that he knew that hey, I was pretty confident we were going the right direction, we were going to be in position to do what we needed to do.

 

Q. He said on Friday he was saying how (indiscernible) uses his positive thinking --

ALAN GUSTAFSON: I love that. We talked about that a little bit today.

 

Q. He does not think he's a positive thinker, so how is it not hard for you to rebuild his confidence?

ALAN GUSTAFSON: I don't feel like I was rebuilding his confidence. I was just basically trying to say, hey, we're not going to screw it up anymore, go do your job. That was kind of it. So my philosophy as a crew chief has always been the same. My goal is to always make the driver the weak link. If he's the weak link, then I've done my job, the team has done their job.

With him it's not an easy thing to do because he's a pretty strong link and obviously other guys that I've worked with. So that's what I try to do. That was a little bit more of what I was describing is I was trying to say to him, hey -- the word I was going to use I'm not going to use. We're done messing up and we're going to get after it, so stick with us, bring your A game, all will be good.

 

THE MODERATOR: Alan, thank you for spending some time with us. We appreciate it. You are free to go.

GM PR

Ty Dillon, No. 42 Black Rifle Coffee Company Chevrolet Camaro ZL1

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START: 29th

FINISH: 31st

POINTS: 26th

Ty Dillon Post-Race Thoughts: “Not the result we wanted or deserved in Nashville. Our Black Rifle Coffee Company Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 was one of the best cars we've had this season with both speed and handling. During that opening run, we were able to climb our way towards the front. Unfortunately, the 14 (Chase Briscoe) got into me and spun us both around early. There was nothing else I could have done as a driver in that situation, even after watching the replay. Based on the hit, I thought we were done for the day. My Petty GMS team kept working on it and we tried to make the most of an unfortunate situation. The car has enough damage that we need to replace the front clip, yet we were still able to finish the race. I feel like we could have been competing for a top-10 finish if things played out differently. We will shift our attention to Road America, one of my favorite road courses, and move on."

 

Erik Jones, No. 43 FOCUSfactor Chevrolet Camaro ZL1

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START: 23rd

FINISH: 11th

POINTS: 16th

Erik Jones Post-Race Thoughts: We definitely had our ups and downs today, but nice to rebound and get an 11th-place finish. We fought the handling of our FOCUSfactor Chevy early in the race and I felt like we were making the right adjustments to have a good day before the rain delay. Once we restarted, after 10-15 laps, the handling would go away and it was just hard to drive. We’ll keep learning and working to get better. Overall, a good finish that we’ll take with us in to next week at Road America.”

Petty GMS PR

Grandview Speedway will host another NASCAR Advance Auto Parts Weekly Racing Series program this Saturday night, continuing the 60th season of auto racing celebration.

It will be a busy week at the 60-year-old one-third-mile high banked clay oval, as the PA 410 Sprint Car Speedweek kicks things off on Tuesday night, June 28, followed by the 52nd annual running of the Firecracker 40 for the T.P. Truck Equipment Sportsman on Saturday night.

This Tuesday, June 28 will see the next NAPA Auto Parts Thunder on the Hill Racing Series event, as the Pennsylvania 410 Sprint Car Speedweek Series will be coming to Grandview to present event number five of the ten race Speedweek series.

The Thunder on the Hill Racing Series will pay tribute to the late Greg Hodnett, as the 410 Sprint Car race is once again titled the Hodnett Cup, with a special trophy to be used for Victory Lane celebrations that was made from a trophy that Hodnett had won at one point in his career. The winner of the Speedweek race will receive a $10,000 payoff for 35-laps on the Grandview high-banks. Joining the 410 Sprints on the program will be the 358 Modifieds chasing a $3000 payday starting at 7:30 pm.

On Tuesday, June 28, adult grandstand admission is $30, children ages 6-11 are $10 and children ages 5 and under are free of charge. Pit admission is $40, and a license is not required.

This will be the only 410 Sprint Car race of the season at Grandview and will be featuring the top drivers of the Pennsylvania Posse along with a few invaders. The last two seasons, NASCAR Cup Series Champion Kyle Larson has been the winner of the Speedweek event at Grandview. PA Posse drivers expected to be in action on Tuesday include Anthony Macri, Freddie Rahmer, Danny Dietrich, Lucas Wolfe, Ryan Smith and Ryan Taylor to name a few.

The 358 Modified portion of the program will see the track regulars battling against some invaders, as is always the case at a Thunder on the Hill program. The two events presented so far this season have seen all-time track feature winner Craig Von Dohren score the feature wins. There will be an extra bonus on the line from Pioneer Pole Buildings of $2000 if the winner of the Modified event is a first time Thunder winner, making the competition even more intense in the 30-lap main event.

For the Independence Day Holiday weekend, Saturday, July 2, the T.P. Truck Equipment NASCAR Sportsman will be competing in the 52nd annual Firecracker 40 championship race starting at 7:30 pm. The program will also include the T.P. Trailer NASCAR Modifieds plus qualifying events leading to the 40-lap T.P. Truck Equipment Sportsman championship paying $2000 to win and the 30-lap T.P. Trailer Modified feature.

Pit gates will open at 4 pm. with grandstand gates opening at 5:30 pm. and warm-ups starting at 6:30 pm. Adult grandstand admission is $22, while children ages 6-11 are $10, and children ages 5 and under are admitted free of charge.

This is the 52nd annual running of the Firecracker 40, however, it was run for the Late Model division from the inception of the race in 1971 until the Late Model class was discontinued after the 2018 season.

The last three seasons the race has been run for the T.P. Truck Equipment Sportsman division. Winning the event during this time were Brad Brightbill in 2019, Brad Arnold in 2020, and Brian Hirthler took the win last year in 2021.

Point leader Dylan Hoch will be a top contender to score a win in the Championship event on Saturday. Hoch rebounded last Saturday night to finish seventh to maintain the top spot in the point standings. Brian Hirthler scored a solid third place effort last Saturday to place second in points, while Kyle Smith scored a fourth-place feature outing and sits third in points. Jimmy Leiby rallied back from a mishap to score a ninth and maintains fourth place in points entering Saturday’s 40-lapper.

The T.P. Truck Equipment Sportsman top ten-points standings are 1. Dylan Hoch -1729, 2. Brian Hirthler – 1691, 3. Kyle Smith – 1668, 4. Jimmy Leiby – 1478, 5. Cole Stangle – 1157, 6. Dakota Kohler – 1063, 7. Mike Schneck Jr. – 1033, 8. Parker Guldin – 1003, 9. Decker Swinehart – 891, 10. Cody Manmiller – 881.

The T.P. Trailer Modifieds saw Brett Kressley pick up his third feature win of the season Saturday night to add to his lead in the point standings. Craig Von Dohren had a second-place feature finish and sits second in points behind Kressley, while Doug Manmiller placed third in Saturday’s feature race and currently sits third in points. Tim Buckwalter (6th) and Duane Howard (4th) each scored top finishes in this past week’s main event to maintain positions four and five in the points race.

The current T.P. Trailer Modified top ten-point standings are 1. Brett Kressley – 2319, 2. Craig Von Dohren – 2270, 3. Doug Manmiller – 2227, 4. Tim Buckwalter – 2099, 5. Duane Hioward – 2028, 6. Jeff Strunk – 1877, 7. Mike Lisowski – 1304, 8. Cory Merkel – 1291, 9. Jared Umbenhauer – 1261, 10. Craig Whitmoyer – 1154.

Since the 1960’s, Grandview Speedway has been presenting exciting wheel to wheel NASCAR stock car racing every Saturday Night starting in April and running through September, plus special events. Grandview Speedway is located at 43 Passmore Road, Bechtelsville, Pa. 19505, just off Route 100, ten miles north of Pottstown, Pa.

Information is always available at www.grandviewspeedway.com or on Facebook, or by telephone at 610.754.7688.

UPCOMING EVENTS –

Tuesday, June 28 – NAPA Auto Parts THUNDER ON THE HILL RACING SERIES – Pennsylvania 410 Sprint Car Speedweek Series Hodnett Cup $10,000 to win, 358 Modifieds – 7:30 pm. 

Saturday, July 2 – T.P. Trailer NASCAR Modifieds, 52nd annual FIRECRACKER 40 for T.P. Truck Equipment NASCAR Sportsman $2000 to win – 7:30 pm.

Friday, July 8 – Outlaw Racing Series Enduro and Outlaw Racing Series Vintage – 7 pm

Saturday, July 9 – T.P. Trailer NASCAR Modifieds, T.P. Truck Equipment NASCAR Sportsman – 7:30 pm.

Saturday, July 16 – T.P. Trailer NASCAR Modifieds, T.P. Truck Equipment NASCAR Sportsman plus URC 360 Sprint Cars – 7:30 pm.

Grandview Speedway PR

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