Matt Tifft Finishes 12th at Dover for Red Horse Racing

After battling changing track conditions in the JACOB Companies 200 at Dover International Speedway, Matt Tifft and the No. 11 Autism Delaware Toyota Tundra team finished in the 12th position. The team unloaded a fast Tundra on Thursday and Tifft posted the third and fourth fastest times in two afternoon practice sessions. Friday arrived with clouds and drizzle and group qualifying was canceled, setting the field per the NASCAR Rule Book, putting Tifft third in the lineup. The green flag dropped under sunny skies, and Tifft reported that the balance was good, but a little tight. Tifft remained in the top five for most of the first half of the race, visiting pit road under caution twice for four Goodyear tires, Sunoco fuel and adjustments. In the final 100 laps, Tifft told crew chief Scott Zipadelli that his Toyota Tundra was a little free in the rear and would wash up the track if he came off the very bottom groove. The team pitted under caution for four tires, fuel and adjustments one final time on lap 135 and Tifft restarted in the eighth position. On the final restart, with 27 laps to go, Tifft restarted in the ninth position, but took the checkered flag in the 12th position.
 
Start - 3
Finish - 12
Driver Points Position - 24
Owner Points Position - 13
Laps Led - 0
 
Matt Tifft Quote:                                          
"I feel like we lost a little bit of roll speed. I think we might have just gone the wrong way on adjustments. It was a lot better in the first half of the race. I'm still really proud of Scott (Zipadelli, crew chief) and these guys, they worked really hard this weekend and we obviously brought a really good Toyota Tundra. And I want to say a big thank you to Autism Delaware for coming on board with us this weekend."  

RHR PR
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Steven B. Wilson

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